Art Education Lessons
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DRAWING II SYLLABUS
D.M. Swartzentruber, MFA

Due
Dates

Grades

* Art Supplies * Studio Care * Recycling
* Attendance/Tardy * On Task * Assessment & Artist Ability
* Labeling Artwork [Front: Signature]
                                 [Back: In pencil print Name. Period. Date. Other Info]

Penalties

Lecture: “Hands and Feet: Simplicity to Complexity”
Lecture: “Fashion Accessories: An Introduction”

Homework: Hands & Feet (conte’)

 ___/30

Project: Fashion for Hands & Feet (watercolor and pencil)

___/100

Lecture: Printmaking Overview
Lecture: Expressions & Distortions
Lecture: Albrecht Durer

Project:  Dry Point Etching using photo of student’s expression

___/100

Lecture: Japanese Printmaking
Lecture: Stamping: A New Look
Lecture: Titles & Editions

Linoleum Relief Print:  “Your floating world”

___/100

 Lecture: “Games: Why play them when you could make them?”
 Lecture: “Karl Wirsum and the Chicago Imagist”

Project: Invent a toy, game, card game, computer game layout (ink/watercolor)

___/100

Lecture: Animals & Physiognomic
Lecture: Physiognomic

Project:  Animal, Animal Mask, Physiognomic, or Animal Hybrid (Oil Pastel)

___/100

 Lecture: “Introduction to Art Therapy”

Project: Amateur Therapist, but Professional Friend” (Mixed Media)

___/100

Lecture:  Grouping Figures: War, Parades, Dances, Crowds

Project: Advanced Figure Drawing Project: Grouping models

___/100

PAC: Artist Review (1/2 page typed review)

___/10

PAC: Artist Review (1/2 page typed review)

___/10

PAC: Artist Review (1/2 page typed review)

___/10

Extra Credit

EXAMINATION


4060-Indiana Standards: Students in drawing engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. In the area of:
  • art history, students search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work through an in-depth analysis of historical and contemporary drawings from a variety of cultural groups identifying relationships between context, form, and function;        
  • art criticism, students search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work by critically examining the relationships between context, form, function, and meaning in their own work and in historical and contemporary drawings;
  • aesthetics, students search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work by:(1) formulating evaluations of historic and contemporary drawings, (2) responding to personal questions about the nature of art, (3) reflecting on their changing definitions of art, and (4) assessing their ideas in relation to the art community; and
  • production, students search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work by choosing and evaluating subject matter, symbols, and ideas that communicate intended meaning in their artwork. In addition, students:  (1) use organizational principles and functions to solve specific visual problems, (2) apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient skill to communicate intended meaning, and (3) use a variety of media such as pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios which demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems.
Students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing. Additionally, students:  (1) reflect upon the outcome of these experiences, (2) explore historical connections, (3) write about the process, (4) make presentations about their progress at regular intervals, (5) work individually and in groups, (6) find a direct correlation to other disciplines, and (7) explore career options related to drawing. Art museums, galleries, studios and community resources are utilized. Overview: This course is an advanced curriculum that builds off of skills achieved in Drawing I. An emphasis on the mastery of drawing within different media is the primary focus. Work by various artists and artistic movements will be studied for historical enrichment. As students develop competency in these various methods and materials they will develop preferences allowing for greater personal artistic deliberation. Students will critique visual art and nurture there own ability at assessing the qualities of drawing.
Assignments: It is important for students to meet deadlines. Work must always be finished and prepared for unannounced class critiques. Critiques give opportunity to learn from the work done by other students and offer opportunity for articulation. Enter accumulated projects and drawings in a portfolio for evaluated at midterm and final examination.Grading: Attendance, Craftsmanship, Creativity/Ambitiousness, Overall improvement A=Outstand/exceptional. Goes above and beyond requirement and expectation in effort, sale, medium, concept, and creativity.
B=Good. Successful completion of assignments with effort that goes demonstrates a good fulfillment of the requirements.
C=Average. Turns assignments in on time and works in class. The work is not remarkable.
F=Inadequate. Shows a lack of interest for the class in effort and development. Missing assignments, class and critiques.

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